ZThemes

roachpatrol:

jetgreguar:

allrightcallmefred:

fredscience:

The Doorway Effect: Why your brain won’t let you remember what you were doing before you came in here

I work in a lab, and the way our lab is set up, there are two adjacent rooms, connected by both an outer hallway and an inner doorway. I do most of my work on one side, but every time I walk over to the other side to grab a reagent or a box of tips, I completely forget what I was after. This leads to a lot of me standing with one hand on the freezer door and grumbling, “What the hell was I doing?” It got to where all I had to say was “Every damn time” and my labmate would laugh. Finally, when I explained to our new labmate why I was standing next to his bench with a glazed look in my eyes, he was able to shed some light. “Oh, yeah, that’s a well-documented phenomenon,” he said. “Doorways wipe your memory.”

Being the gung-ho new science blogger that I am, I decided to investigate. And it’s true! Well, doorways don’t literally wipe your memory. But they do encourage your brain to dump whatever it was working on before and get ready to do something new. In one study, participants played a video game in which they had to carry an object either across a room or into a new room. Then they were given a quiz. Participants who passed through a doorway had more trouble remembering what they were doing. It didn’t matter if the video game display was made smaller and less immersive, or if the participants performed the same task in an actual room—the results were similar. Returning to the room where they had begun the task didn’t help: even context didn’t serve to jog folks’ memories.

The researchers wrote that their results are consistent with what they call an “event model” of memory. They say the brain keeps some information ready to go at all times, but it can’t hold on to everything. So it takes advantage of what the researchers called an “event boundary,” like a doorway into a new room, to dump the old info and start over. Apparently my brain doesn’t care that my timer has seconds to go—if I have to go into the other room, I’m doing something new, and can’t remember that my previous task was antibody, idiot, you needed antibody.

Read more at Scientific American, or the original study.

I finally learned why I completely space when I cross to the other side of the lab, and that I’m apparently not alone.

this is actually kind of great and it’s nice to know there’s something behind that constant spacing out whenever i enter a different place

FINALLY AN EXPLANATION

Aaah tomorrow it’s the Belgium’s National Day huhu. Party time ~

takatsu:

I’ve said this again and again,and I would never get tired of reiterating: Haikyuu brings something new and something extremely important to the world of sports anime. 

That is advancing the perspective of the defeated, the characters in the periphery, the characters that we often forget and bypass when we watch sports series.

We’ve had a lot of sports series in the past years—series that emphasize the value of determination, teamwork, patience, and talent—the key to catching that win. But is that all there to is? Is competition just about winning, or more importantly—

Is it just about WINNERS?

I must say, this has been the most emotional episode of Haikyuu for me. Why? Cause we get to see that losing is something unnatural. Okay. Yeah. Losing is inevitable, but the way we focus on the story of the winners makes us forget how the other teams have felt. In this case, Furudate-sensei has achieved something I haven’t ever seen from the other sports anime that I’ve watched. He knows that these other teams also have their stories. It makes me glad that this episode was told from the perspective of the losing team. If this was the conventional sports anime, we would’ve shrugged our shoulders over this other team, went full force on supporting the protagonists. But no. It made you feel like, “Hey, it doesn’t really matter who wins. Everyone is doing their best, aren’t they?

Another point of contention is the fact that the rival teams have always been presented in an antagonistic way—arrogant players who just wanted to bring down those who get in their way, athletes who only think of winning, blah, blah, blah. In the Nekoma vs. Karasuno match, I did not see any antagonist in Nekoma. They were supporting each other. To quote the Nekoma Coach, “they bring out the best in each other, that’s why they are called ‘rivals’.”

Watching this episode only made me realize again that in essence, their is no useless team. Every single player, every single team—all of them has their own story, their own purpose. Their relationships might rest on rivalry or friendship—but these two things all boil down to the fact that they are “bonds”, reactions that make the competing teams better and improve themselves. After all, this is the essence of sports—continuing to challenge yourself and come out as a better, stronger, and serious player.

I do hope, and sincerely so, that Haikyuu continues to be like this. :)

(Source : zankyou-no-takatsu)

smirking-raven:

Ciel Phantomhive || Kuroshitsuji Chapter 95

smirking-raven:

Ciel Phantomhive || Kuroshitsuji Chapter 95
funtomking:

Cɪᴇʟ Pʜᴀɴᴛᴏᴍʜɪᴠᴇ - Cʜᴀᴘᴛᴇʀ 95 | Eᴅɪᴛ ʙʏ ғᴜɴᴛᴏᴍᴋɪɴɢ

funtomking:

Cɪᴇʟ Pʜᴀɴᴛᴏᴍʜɪᴠᴇ - Cʜᴀᴘᴛᴇʀ 95 | Eᴅɪᴛ ʙʏ ғᴜɴᴛᴏᴍᴋɪɴɢ

seba-ciel:

the only thing i can say about this chapter is

image

image

Boo

(Source : mrkaneki-kun)

smirking-raven:

"I used your power. Not for anyone else!! But for myself!!"
                  -Ciel Phantomhive || Kuroshitsuji Chapter 95